Members Login
Post Info TOPIC: Variable Frequency Drive need some help


WHITEFISH, ONT

Status: Offline
Posts: 18
Date:
Variable Frequency Drive need some help
Permalink  
 


Hi, anyone have knowledge with replacing a single phase electric motor with a VFD and a three phase motor. Looking for help selecting motor voltage and HP and then getting correct size VFD for a wood lathe to have variable speed. For starters the lathe turns too fast for out of balance rough blanks, lathe motor is 220V and 3/4 HP.

thanks

Paul

 



__________________


GTA

Status: Offline
Posts: 78
Date:
Permalink  
 

Can't help you with the VFD but I can suggest looking into retrofitting an electric motor and its controls from a used treadmill (if this is for home use). I believe the industrial treadmills are generally 220V but a 110V "home" version might work for your application. Treadmills typically come with decent HP, variable speed and are always available (mostly the 110V versions) on Kijiji in the GTA ... then I noticed where you live. Might be too hard to find in your area but thought I'd mention it just in case.

__________________

I think I can, I think I can, I think I can ... yet I still can't.



MARKHAM, ONT

Status: Offline
Posts: 828
Date:
Permalink  
 

240 volts, 3 phase motor.
1 HP, just a bit more than you have should do you.
The smaller the motor, the cheaper the drive.

I got mine from Wolf Automation in the States.

 

https://www.wolfautomation.com/products/ac-drives



__________________
PUGSY


WHITEFISH, ONT

Status: Offline
Posts: 18
Date:
Permalink  
 

thanks for the suggestion Pete

Pugsy

I've seen 3 phase motor voltages of 208, 220, 230 how critical is this voltage.

The lathe is for home hobby wood turning and want to try my hand at sheet metal spinning.

thanks
Paul

__________________


MARKHAM, ONT

Status: Offline
Posts: 828
Date:
Permalink  
 

Rockhauler wrote:

thanks for the suggestion Pete

Pugsy

I've seen 3 phase motor voltages of 208, 220, 230 how critical is this voltage.

The lathe is for home hobby wood turning and want to try my hand at sheet metal spinning.

thanks
Paul


 Probably not too important but not 100% sure. I believe I bought a 220 volt, 3 phase for our drill press at work.

Man, what a great set up. The guys never have to muck around changing the belts anymore.

The beauty thing is is still plugs into a 120 volt receptacle.

 

One of the drives on the link says 208 - 240 volts, so you're probably OK with any voltages thru the range.

If you're not sure about the motor, go a HP over. You'll never  in your life be sorry that you used a higher HP motor.



-- Edited by 123pugsy on Saturday 17th of June 2017 03:01:38 PM

__________________
PUGSY


WHITEFISH, ONT

Status: Offline
Posts: 18
Date:
Permalink  
 

Done some research on this but all the info always stopped short of giving good detail on power loss through the vfd though they mention it happens. Never found any info on whether I need to compensate by increasing the motors hp or if there would be loss of torque issues at slower rpm's.

I figured the voltage wouldn't be real critical but on a lathe the longer run times might cause motor heat issues if there's a voltage miss match.

Been trying to find a cheap used vfd but so far if there cheap then the input voltage has to be 3 phase too. The vfd's with the 208-240 volt range would likely be my best bet over ones stating a single output voltage.

thanks for your input pugsy

Paul


__________________


ONTARIO

Status: Offline
Posts: 372
Date:
Permalink  
 

I've used Hitachi VFDs and never had an issue. Buy one rated for 2hp and put plugs on both ends. This way you can use the same VFD for multiple machines. don't be concerned too much about the voltage rating of the 3 phase motor as long as you're in the 208-240V range. Like you already mentioned, make sure you buy one that is 220 single phase in.

__________________


WHITEFISH, ONT

Status: Offline
Posts: 18
Date:
Permalink  
 

Thanks Pete like that idea of the plugs so the vfd can be used on multiple machines as Pugsy has me thinking of converting my drill press too.



__________________


ONTARIO

Status: Offline
Posts: 372
Date:
Permalink  
 

Rockhauler wrote:

Thanks Pete like that idea of the plugs so the vfd can be used on multiple machines as Pugsy has me thinking of converting my drill press too.


 Who would have thought that 3 phase motors would ever be good for home use ? smilesmile

Would be great for a drill press because you'll have high torque at low speeds, and a 3000 RPM motor can be over driven to 90HZ to get 4500 RPM. Technically, a VFD driven motor needs a higher insulation value, but for occasional use like a home shop a standard motor will last forever.

 



-- Edited by Petebil on Monday 19th of June 2017 03:03:07 PM

__________________


MARKHAM, ONT

Status: Offline
Posts: 828
Date:
Permalink  
 

Here's a lousy video I did.

This was before it was set to use the dial for the speed control.

 

 



__________________
PUGSY


MARKHAM, ONT

Status: Offline
Posts: 828
Date:
Permalink  
 

Petebil wrote:

I've used Hitachi VFDs and never had an issue. Buy one rated for 2hp and put plugs on both ends. This way you can use the same VFD for multiple machines. don't be concerned too much about the voltage rating of the 3 phase motor as long as you're in the 208-240V range. Like you already mentioned, make sure you buy one that is 220 single phase in.


 Doesn't need 220 in.

You can go 120 in and 240, 3 phase out. Freakin amazing.



__________________
PUGSY


ONTARIO

Status: Offline
Posts: 372
Date:
Permalink  
 

123pugsy wrote:
Petebil wrote:

I've used Hitachi VFDs and never had an issue. Buy one rated for 2hp and put plugs on both ends. This way you can use the same VFD for multiple machines. don't be concerned too much about the voltage rating of the 3 phase motor as long as you're in the 208-240V range. Like you already mentioned, make sure you buy one that is 220 single phase in.


 Doesn't need 220 in.

You can go 120 in and 240, 3 phase out. Freakin amazing.


 You can, but not for a 2HP motor. You would need a 30 amp 115 volt outlet which is non existent is residential areas. Best to sick to 220v. 



__________________


GALT, ONT

Status: Offline
Posts: 145
Date:
Permalink  
 

Petebil wrote:
123pugsy wrote:
Petebil wrote:

I've used Hitachi VFDs and never had an issue. Buy one rated for 2hp and put plugs on both ends. This way you can use the same VFD for multiple machines. don't be concerned too much about the voltage rating of the 3 phase motor as long as you're in the 208-240V range. Like you already mentioned, make sure you buy one that is 220 single phase in.


 Doesn't need 220 in.

You can go 120 in and 240, 3 phase out. Freakin amazing.


 You can, but not for a 2HP motor. You would need a 30 amp 115 volt outlet which is non existent is residential areas. Best to sick to 220v. 


 just wondering where you got the 30amp from,, is that empirical,, or from a code book....   I do know some numbers from experience,, and once you get into chopper circuits.. the code book tables arn't even close..    but I don't know VFD numbers.. so that Is why I am asking..

 

 



__________________

 

 



MARKHAM, ONT

Status: Offline
Posts: 828
Date:
Permalink  
 

Petebil wrote:
123pugsy wrote:
Petebil wrote:

I've used Hitachi VFDs and never had an issue. Buy one rated for 2hp and put plugs on both ends. This way you can use the same VFD for multiple machines. don't be concerned too much about the voltage rating of the 3 phase motor as long as you're in the 208-240V range. Like you already mentioned, make sure you buy one that is 220 single phase in.


 Doesn't need 220 in.

You can go 120 in and 240, 3 phase out. Freakin amazing.


 You can, but not for a 2HP motor. You would need a 30 amp 115 volt outlet which is non existent is residential areas. Best to sick to 220v. 


 I'll have to check what I used on my drill press. Probably a smaller HP motor.

I'm using 240 input on my milling machine.



__________________
PUGSY


ONTARIO

Status: Offline
Posts: 528
Date:
Permalink  
 

You all are getting off real easy. I bought a new 7 1/2 HP Ph converter and then that is where all my headaches started. Had an electrician come down to put a new panel in. Then Hydro One got involved and made me put in two new poles on my property. PLUS pay for two new poles that they owned including the one ACROSS the road. Then my panel could go in and then the phase converter and a 600 volt transformer. Cathleen Gwen just loves to down load and keep it a secret until she stabs you in the back for the tune of $8,700. just for poles. All this hydro down loading they do not tell us about even though we are paying maintenance on your monthly bill. I am talking residential not commensal.



-- Edited by Smokin Joe on Tuesday 20th of June 2017 04:31:06 PM

__________________

Yes they are all crazzzy but me and you........... and I am not sure about you!!!!



ONTARIO

Status: Offline
Posts: 372
Date:
Permalink  
 

meester_jamie wrote:


 just wondering where you got the 30amp from,, is that empirical,, or from a code book....   I do know some numbers from experience,, and once you get into chopper circuits.. the code book tables arn't even close..    but I don't know VFD numbers.. so that Is why I am asking..

 

 


 30 amp is a rough estimate. instead of trying to explain, check out this link------->http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/elctrical-motor-full-load-current-d_1499.html

2HP will draw around 13 amps @ 220v.  @ 110v it will draw around 26 amps so in theory you would need a 30amp 115v circuit. It's just a rough guess, but I'm in the ball park. Was just trying to make a point as to why you don't want to double the voltage.



-- Edited by Petebil on Tuesday 20th of June 2017 05:26:51 PM

__________________


MARKHAM, ONT

Status: Offline
Posts: 828
Date:
Permalink  
 

Petebil wrote:
meester_jamie wrote:


 just wondering where you got the 30amp from,, is that empirical,, or from a code book....   I do know some numbers from experience,, and once you get into chopper circuits.. the code book tables arn't even close..    but I don't know VFD numbers.. so that Is why I am asking..

 

 


 30 amp is a rough estimate. instead of trying to explain, check out this link------->http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/elctrical-motor-full-load-current-d_1499.html

2HP will draw around 13 amps @ 220v.  @ 110v it will draw around 26 amps so in theory you would need a 30amp 115v circuit. It's just a rough guess, but I'm in the ball park. Was just trying to make a point as to why you don't want to double the voltage.



-- Edited by Petebil on Tuesday 20th of June 2017 05:26:51 PM


 Thanks.

I completely didn't consider amperage. Been a few coupla years since I did the conversion.

Just checked our drill press.

It's 3/4 HP running on 120 volts.

IMG_2668.JPG

 

 



Attachments
__________________
PUGSY
Page 1 of 1  sorted by
 
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.



Create your own FREE Forum
Report Abuse
Powered by ActiveBoard