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Frame repair
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Good day all. I have been stripping my truck down to the frame as alot of body's work needs done and engine and transmission.  It's a project to say the least. My question is I have found some rotten spots on the outrigger for the cab and and wondering if frame repair needs to be done by a licenced shop or if I can weld it myself. This truck is registered as unfit and would need a full safety to get it on the road.thanks for any help



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ALLAN PARK, ONT ADMINISTRATOR

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You mention in your other post that you are a novice welder at best......The frame is the main structure of a vehicle, welds need to be good and strong. I would suggest a pro doing it.

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FOXBORO, ONT

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MTO allows welding of a frame but

It needs to be a good , proper job

And like Poncho says



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MARKHAM, ONT

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What kind of welder do you have?

Get some scrap metal about the same thickness as the outriggers, chamfer the edges 100% and start practicing.
Post up questions and pics here and we'll get you welding in no time.

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PUGSY


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I've got a millermatic 211 autososet. I will post some pics shortly. I've got a scrap frame the same as the one I'm going to be working on to practice with

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MARKHAM, ONT

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According to MTO, this is the new fail criteria we have to use for for frames during Safety:

 

c) - bulge caused by corrosion - stress crack at side rail or rub-rail - rivet is loose, missing, dimpled by corrosion - bent, broken, cracked, kinked, welded or repaired in a way that does not meet OEM standard or industry standard - perforated or weakened by corrosion

 

The full act can be found here:

http://www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/trucks/pdfs/passenger-light-duty-vehicle-inspection-standard.pdf

 

The biggest mistake I see is people using material that is too thick or boxing rails that are not supposed to be boxed.  Doing so effectively removes the crumple zones that are engineered into the car at best or at worst creates a harpoon if the car is involved in a bad accident.  I lost a good friend to this exact scenario.

 

Craig



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Ok thanks. I'm assuming if I take the frame to a frame shop for repairs and have a paper trail of proper frame repair that I can present that when getting safeties? Also what are the ruled about body rust and floor pan rust?

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ONTARIO

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Mattmctree wrote:

Ok thanks. I'm assuming if I take the frame to a frame shop for repairs and have a paper trail of proper frame repair that I can present that when getting safeties? Also what are the ruled about body rust and floor pan rust?


 A paper trail is a waste of time. It will be up to the mechanic whether the welds look acceptable or not, so he won't care how much paper work you have. As far as other rust, there can be no holes going into the passenger compartment, and all other panels can't have any sharp edges.



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you also have to use a stick welder mig is not allowed so they say

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Ronbulmer


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The only limitation on the type of welding in the Handbook is in the section dealing with repairs to holes in the floor. The way I read it, in this specific section the Handbook prohibits “arc welding” (stick) and “flame repair” (oxy/acetylene), but allows MIG and TIG. The repair you’re looking at would fall under “frame or subframe” and here, the book just says they can’t be welded or repaired in a way that “does not meet OEM standard or industry standard”. In my opinion, you can repair this area with any welding method, including MIG, TIG, or stick. As mentioned, the new metal should be as close to the same thickness as the original, and it would be a good idea to leave the area in bare metal so the tech can see the repaired area. You can paint it or undercoat it later.

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