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Post Info TOPIC: cooling system puzzle - will I ever get to Port Hope ?


PETERBOROUGH, ONT

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cooling system puzzle - will I ever get to Port Hope ?
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1966 Ford 289 - I recently replaced my rad core, my thermostat, my water pump, flushed the system and filled the system to about one inch below the rad cap. I drove about half an hour away and back for a show in Millbrook on a fairly hot day but not humid. My new Classic Instruments electric water temperature gauge rested around 180 degrees once it was on the road for a while. A pleasant run (except for my alternator - but that's another story).

This past Saturday, I made my 3rd attempt to get to the Port Hope cruise night. The weather was very hot and humid and Port Hope is about 45 minutes away. I got about 15 minutes out and noticed my gauge rising to about 215 degrees. Another 5 minutes got me to a shady spot in Baliboro and 220 degrees so I pulled over for 20 minutes to let it cool down. Then I turned around and went home.  It reached 220 again by the time I got home.

It was a very hot and humid day on Saturday but at 220 degrees, should I suspect a fault in my new gauge ?  My friend Bill says it must be a faulty gauge and I can't trust anything these days just because they're new parts. I said it was from Speedway and Classic Instruments. He said it still doesn't matter. He said that he gets a lot of new parts that are faulty these days.

So my question is, could the problem be something else or should I request Speedway or Classic Instruments replace my gauge ?



-- Edited by Cuddles on Monday 8th of August 2022 08:34:31 AM

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MARKHAM, ONT

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Faulty gauges that only act up when its hot and humid seems a like a stretch to me but I am admittedly skeptical.  I suspect the problem you are having is an ignition timing issue.  If you set the timing close to the original 1966 spec, the spark is not lighting the air fuel mixture early enough and the newer fuels burn slower than fuel did in 1966 so the burning fuel heats up 3 inches of cylinder instead of one inch as designed.  Even the biggest rad in the world won't cool that down.  Try setting your timing to 34 degrees at 3500 rpm with the vacuum advance disconnected.  (reconnect when you are done, vacuum advance is a must have on the street)  I suspect it will start better, run better and offer better gas mileage.  if you don't like it, just put it back to where it is now, net investment is about 15 minutes.   



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PETERBOROUGH, ONT

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Boy I hope you are right. I don't quite understand it but it sounds like another aspect of my build that I should get to learn about.
I am writing it down and anxious to give it a try. Thank you very much Livetodrive.

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MARKHAM, ONT

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Got a pic of your shroud and fan set up?

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PETERBOROUGH, ONT

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C5B85E74-4DB3-4FB0-B38E-13540C417F95.jpeg



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BELLEVILLE, ONT

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Take those plastic sleeves off your plug wires. Use separators, spark will jump through the wires, inducting a miss fire. Back 2 cylinders on the left are really prone to this because they fire right after each other. ( this assuming I'm remembering this old stuff correctly, it's been a while). But definitely separate those wires.


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MARKHAM, ONT

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No problem, I'll try and explain better.  If the spark happens at just the right time when the piston is coming up the cylinder, then the gases heat up and expand at just the right time and the piston is at top dead center.  If the timing is too far advanced, the optimum expansion happens before the piston gets all the way to the top.  If the timing is not advanced enough, the flame front follows the piston back downward and heats up a lot more of the exposed cylinder.  It gets a bit trickier when you figure in the engine spinning faster (flame still travels at the same rate) or changes in the fuel mixture.  Leaner mixture burns slower, richer burns faster.  Carburetors are a bit flawed since they don't deliver a consistent mixture as you accelerate.  For the 289 34 degrees @ 3500 rpm should be close to the sweet spot.  Let me know how it goes?  You may have to bring the idle back down after setting the timing as the increased efficiency will bring the rpms up.



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MARKHAM, ONT

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Is the fan working?

Does it stay running when the engine is hot?

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PETERBOROUGH, ONT

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I will remove the plastic as instructed and use spark separators. Thank you.
Yes the fan is working and is does draw air in and my friend Bill made it so it runs when the engine runs instead of running only when the engine reaches temperatures that are too hot.
What seems most odd to me is that I drove further a week or two before with no temperature problems at all and this time, travelling the same route for half the way, it overheated (according to my new Classic instrument gauge - which worked fine two weeks ago also). The only difference I can see is the weather was really hot this time and really humid. But curiously, when I rested the engine in Bailiboro for 20 minutes, there was no overflow onto the road at all.The same when I got home. 220 degrees and no spillage at all. Not a drop.
And keeping in mind that I am learning under the guidance of the kindness I find here and my hands on mechanic Bill, when I mentioned about the 34 degree setting for my timing (word for word - I had it written down) Bill said "That's a crock of shi ..." I think Bill should consider aviation as a hobby because he tends to fly off the handle easily. Anyway, Bill said the 34 degrees would apply if I were racing (which I don't). Although prior to your instruction, I do recall him saying he wanted to check my timing. Maybe he just doesn't like any advice offered on the net. He hates advice gleaned on the net.
If it doesn't rain, I will drive to the Hastings cruise night tonight and Bill will bring a temperature tester to hold against the block to see how it compares with my gauge reading. And it is much cooler out now so conditions won't be the same. Thank you to all for helping. First things first, remove the plastic sleeves !

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MARKHAM, ONT

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Sounds like you found the fix.  You clearly have a defective "Bob".  When he cools down a bit have him read this entire article and then he can try arguing with physics.  We will see how that works out for him.

 

https://www.fordmuscle.com/archives/2000/03/timing/

 

 



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MARKHAM, ONT

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Cuddles, all kidding aside, I enjoy "calling bull****" as much as the next guy but you have to careful with this stuff.  If the timing is not set up properly, it is really hard on the poor engine.  In a short period of time you will likely burn an exhaust valve driving it like this.  If "Bob" can't see the light, get someone who can.  Summer is too short to drive a car that does not run right.



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PETERBOROUGH, ONT

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And I just had my valves done because one valve was badly burned. I think it was like that when I bought it in 17 but I don't know for sure. I keep rereading your message on how the 34 degrees works and you explain it very well I think.
My friend Bill has been a mechanic for 32 years and 32 years of experience unfortunately (I think) gives him a solid base to argue from. In his defence, if not for him, I wouldn't be on the road yet. But you nailed it when you mentioned burnt valves.

"In a short period of time you will burn an exhaust valve" - That frightens me because what a waste of time, effort and money to go through that again. I will tell the guy who repaired my valves and see if he will have a word with Bill. If he tells Bill, Bill might listen. Bill listens to Dean. I watched Bill set my timing but I don't have a light and I've never done it myself. Thank you live to drive.

I had the car out again last night and it ran hot but didn't overflow (220 after 20 - 30 minutes). I will tell dean what you said. It makes sense to me. I hope it doesn't offend Bill that I listen to others as well (but I fear it will).

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MARKHAM, ONT

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No problem, for me its not about winning arguments, its about sharing accurate information.  I've been a LDV/HDV Tech since 95, managed an automotive technical support line for 5 years and did automotive technical training for 10.  I'm proud to say I still learn something new every day.  If you fundamentally understand why late ignition heats up the exhaust valve, my work here is done.  (in summary, if the exhaust valve opens while the fuel is still burning, the poor little valve gets roasted as a flame shoots out the exhaust)  



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PETERBOROUGH, ONT

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That makes sense to me. Please understand that as a novice anxious to learn, I recognize that I must consider my sources and weigh each accordingly while trying not to offend. Now I have to find a way to do as you advise without offending Bill. Ah well, one step at a time. Thank you so much Livetodrive !!!

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PETERBOROUGH, ONT

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I read the article completely and understand some of it, the important parts I think. It is all a bit above my understanding at this point but I get the gist of it. Very nice that the focus is on SBFs.
What still frightens me is when you said "in a short period of time". Did you mean over minutes, hours, weeks or months ? Perhaps I have already burnt my valves again and I've only been out on a few short runs since having my valves done ?

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PETERBOROUGH, ONT

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Hey Lightspeed Mike - I removed the plastic sleeves right away. Thank you for that.

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DOURO, ONT

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any chance you have a reverse rotation water pump on it by accident?

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MARKHAM, ONT

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If your valves have been done recently, you likely have a few months driving before any issues come up.  New valve job means the valves will seat well and transfer the heat into the head better.   Ironically, the heat will then transfer from the cylinder head and into your coolant.  LOL!



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CAMPBELLFORD, ONT

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Extremely good question Ken, being a small block Ford,

this is a really good possibility too!  

Seeker1056 wrote:

any chance you have a reverse rotation water pump on it by accident?


 



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MARKHAM, ONT

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Have you checked your timing yet Jim?

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PETERBOROUGH, ONT

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I am hoping to check my timing today. Can I just put on the timing light or do I have to pull out the distributor and the #1 plug again ? I forget. I guess it is possible I have a reverse rotation water pump. I didn't know there is such a thing. I still have the box. It might tell me. Wouldn't the shop give me the standard unless I ask for a reverse rotation pump ?
I tend to put off things like checking my timing in case it's more bad news. Getting a lot of bad news lately. Not anxious for more but I guess I better check it today.
I had no temperature issues on my ride to Millbrook on the 16th. 180 degrees there and back. Had alternator / battery issues though and I don't remember if we did anything with the timing. I will try to do the 34 degree thing today. It isn't puking coolant at least and I don't have an overflow/expansion tank anymore. I think some silicone from my overflow got into my rad and destroyed it so I disconnected it from the new rad core. So much to learn all at once.

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MARKHAM, ONT

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Just remember, its 34 degrees at 3500 rpm, with the vacuum advance disabled.   No you don't have to pull the distributer.  If you put a paint mark on the base of the distributer to the block you can put the distributer right back where it was if you don't like it.  A second thought just came to mind, if you were also having electrical issues, is it possible the fan was getting less than 12 volts from the charging system.  If it was turning slower that probably did not help the situation when you were idling.  When you are driving there should have been enough air flowing through the rad to keep it cool?



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PETERBOROUGH, ONT

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Well my friend Bill called me and I didn't read him the entire article but I mentioned the 34 degrees and 3500 rpms and I could tell he was losing patience with me. I said I'd bring him the article and he made it clear I didn't need to. Bill insisted that 34 degrees at 3500 rpms was for racing and I'd need special weights in my distributor (if I remember right ) and he mentioned something about a curve. He said I could change the timing from where he set it to 34 degrees but my engine would blow.
I don't want to get him any more angry with me so I guess I'll let it slide. But thank you very much for trying.
Bill mentioned meeting an old friend at a cruise night gathering last night and his friend has a spare mechanical gauge I am welcome to borrow to compare the readings with my electrical gauge.
Yes, my battery was running the car and the alternator wasn't getting 'tickled' to kick in but I think Chris Stapley fixed that problem for me. What a nice guy. Both Bill and Chris have been very patient with me and generous with their time. Great guys. Bill is just a bit short tempered. Well actually, even Bill says his fuse is short when dealing with stupid. He hasn't punched my lights out yet but I think I'm on the edge. I better back off a while.
I will forever be curious about the 34 degrees now. The article makes sense to me, especially when taking into account the older engines and newer gas in the older cylinders. I just have to keep my ears and mind open to all kind enough to offer their expertise and then hope for the best. I enjoy this pastime and meeting all these kind people with skills and stories to share. I know more than I did when I started but such a long way to go ( without offending anyone ). Thank you again Livetodrive.

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NIAGARA FALLS, ONT

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My question is,, is the car actually overheating or just running at 220 degrees.Is 220 as high as it got or does it keep rising. I just think with all you,ve done to cooling system it should not be overheating unless you have a severe circulation problem and i can,t see that if temp only goes to 220. Timing could be a solution . You should check it to be sure. What temp thermostat are you running?


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PETERBOROUGH, ONT

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It seems to sit at 220 but that could be incorrect because when I reach 220, I pull over and shut down. The thermostat is a 160 I think. You think timing too ? I will have to check it. No harm in checking to be safe. Thank you


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PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY, ONT

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cap.jpg

 

Remove your thermostat to be sure it is not sticking.  Run the engine without it.  Your rad and engine should generally be the same temp.  Get a thermostat rad cap at CTC or NAPA or wherever and verify your gauge to the cap.  A 12 lb. cap will prevent boiling up to 250 degrees.  Run a 50/50 mix of antifreeze.  There is nothing harmful about running 220 as long as you are not boiling over.  Do you have adequate air flow?  The screen in your nose is pretty far ahead of the rad and the air flow probably dies before it reaches the rad.  The air must be moving at speed to cool the rad which cools the engine.  Remove the screen and drive without it to test air flow. Your screen is probably blocking 50% of the air flow.  In fact, I would do the screen first, then the thermostat, then the rad cap.

scartissu.jpeg

Warren



-- Edited by wuga on Sunday 14th of August 2022 10:20:08 AM

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NIAGARA FALLS, ONT

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Thats a good point on the screen. It is a pretty tight pattern and no doubt reduces air flow. i also went on line and punched in "whats normal running temp for a 1966 ford 289 engine and numbers were anywhere from 205 to 220 degrees. I,d remove the screen ,take her for a run and see how it acts. if it runs at 215--220 with no obvious sighns of boil over you should be OK.


cap.jpg

 

Remove your thermostat to be sure it is not sticking.  Run the engine without it.  Your rad and engine should generally be the same temp.  Get a thermostat rad cap at CTC or NAPA or wherever and verify your gauge to the cap.  A 12 lb. cap will prevent boiling up to 250 degrees.  Run a 50/50 mix of antifreeze.  There is nothing harmful about running 220 as long as you are not boiling over.  Do you have adequate air flow?  The screen in your nose is pretty far ahead of the rad and the air flow probably dies before it reaches the rad.  The air must be moving at speed to cool the rad which cools the engine.  Remove the screen and drive without it to test air flow. Your screen is probably blocking 50% of the air flow.  In fact, I would do the screen first, then the thermostat, then the rad cap.

scartissu.jpeg

Warren



-- Edited by wuga on Sunday 14th of August 2022 10:20:08 AM


 



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PETERBOROUGH, ONT

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15EEA619-A44A-4CC1-9B9D-7A15F91C6F40.jpeg

All great news. It will take a lot of dismantling to get the chainmail out but worth the effort if you advise it. I'll try and attach a better photo of the grill. I thought chainmail would ensure I had enough airflow. Straight on, it looked like a pretty open weave to me (but wrong again). Thank you both. I am going to get a thermostat rad cap today regardless of the grill removal just to verify the gauge is functioning correctly. Bill said we can't trust any new parts these days. So much junk comes from China.

 



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PETERBOROUGH, ONT

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50% of airflow ? Wow. I had no idea. Thank you again.

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PETERBOROUGH, ONT

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Would 13 psi be ok ?
www.amazon.ca/Mr-Gasket-2470R-Domestic-ThermoCap/dp/B000OF7MJS/ref=asc_df_B000OF7MJS/

I'll keep looking for 12 pound. Maybe Speedway.

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PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY, ONT

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13 is fine. Anywhere in that range.
Warren

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BARRIE, ONTARIO

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and also the picture showing your dist and plug wires . The fan shroud looks wider then the radiator core , which I can see would look good to cover the veiw of back side of rad for esthetics . . I cat really see how your fan is set up , But a general rule for rads and shrouds is , from the grille to the rad core you want incoming air to be forced to go thru the fins / core . If your nose cone is all open on the bottom the air will go under the car instead of thru the radiator fins , escaping under or around the rad is path of least resistance
and your fan shroud has to seal the suction of the fan to the back of the fins / core . If there are openings around the edges of shroud to the core , the fan will pull air thru that area
but at road speeds you want to make sure your airflow is forced thru the core
You can buy a princess auto temperature gun or any parts store . When you get the car running at the temps that concern you check the temp of top rad hose near t stat housing , check bottom rad hose near the pump and try to check the temp of core fins about an inch or two from the bottom and top of fins core
and were all sorta semi adults , re read the instructions on the temp gun operation / usage AND fingers dont grow back
AND you can use a temp gun for many things ie checking temps of your heater and ac units checking brake temperatures check exhaust manifold runners looking for hot or cold running cylinders
My Old Lady is from a little island in caribbean and if she is out in the sun a lot during the day at night she gives off incredible body heat . I have my heat gun in a dresser drawer to check her temps when shes trying to burn me . Its fun
And note a temp gun will actually read the outside of a hose as a few degrees cooler then the coolant inside the hose

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PETERBOROUGH, ONT

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Thank you 77. I already made and painted a lower section for the fan shroud. I hope to put it on today but I have to drain all the coolant and remove the lower hose to get it in place. If I have to add a sheet of steel inside the rad shell from the grill to the rad, I'll make that up too. Warren's idea of removing the grill is excellent but I'm hoping I can find a way to keep the grill just because I like it and it was a lot of work to make and mount. But I had no idea I could lose so much air flow using chainmail. Whatever it takes, I'll do to get my temperature down but I'll try one step at a time. On the bright side, it was the hottest 2 weeks of summer but I should improve airflow where I can anyway. I think a lower panel inside the rad shell between the grill and rad is well worth trying.
I tried to buy a temperature gun at CTC and NAPA but I guess they were out of stock. I'll try again.
Is an actual fan like we used to see standard on the front of the engine more / less efficient ? And why do they look different now with a shiny extension on the blades?

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PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY, ONT

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www.amazon.ca/Inkbird-Thermometer-%EF%BC%8CNon-Contact-Temperature-58%E2%84%89-1022%E2%84%89/dp/B08RNJMN1F/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?crid=DAQ5MHFZKE6L&keywords=temperature+sensor+gun&qid=1660831369&sprefix=temperature+sensor+gun%2Caps%2C136&sr=8-1-spons&psc=1&spLa=ZW5jcnlwdGVkUXVhbGlmaWVyPUExMFEzTFFRSDc1Q0hYJmVuY3J5cHRlZElkPUEwNjM2MTQxMTdKNk1RWkdaUEJMTyZlbmNyeXB0ZWRBZElkPUEwMzY4NjU1MjlSWVc4NzNXTDVURiZ3aWRnZXROYW1lPXNwX2F0ZiZhY3Rpb249Y2xpY2tSZWRpcmVjdCZkb05vdExvZ0NsaWNrPXRydWU=

Amazon 34.99 it is what I use.

measure both hoses, rad top and bottom, both heads front and back, block all over. With no thermostat, these should all be about the same. It will tell if you are getting good circulation. Closing off the bottom of the nose to force air through the rad should help. Air always takes the easiest path.

Warren

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PETERBOROUGH, ONT

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Thank you Warren. I started making a 'floor' for the nose earlier today. I will get the thermometer (Inkbird) too. I'll have to remove the chainmail grill to make a pattern for the floor to ensure it fits snug to the base of the rad so this works out well.

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BARRIE, ONTARIO

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Hey before you totally scrap discard your grille assembly
Try thinking of ways to to open it up for better airflow
remember guys used to cut an iron cross design for a rear window hole in a t bucket and the like
So heres your plan the plate says Scartissue , you got a funky cool old yellow hot rod , it has a ford motor in it
Noew before throwing out the grille , finger out a way to incorporate a design into it that A will allow more airflow and 2 still afford some protection to the core

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PETERBOROUGH, ONT

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238E2121-A9C6-4A57-94BC-82853947E17F.jpegCAD02B91-0FC2-4706-94F3-C077CB862CD1.jpegCCB528D2-4F8B-4FD0-9C09-864AE60DB9D2.jpeg136AB57C-0250-438D-88BA-E846FD8554C4.jpeg

Thank you 77. That's a fresh and very nice approach if this attempt fails. I hadn't thought of that. But I am going to attempt to fix the problem in steps, the least radical first. 

I am experiencing some cash flow issues (for the first time since I got the car, my wife said my spending has been a bit much of late. She has been very patient, I'll say that but she's right.  Added to that are unexpected expenses, I wrecked the garage door opener and our jet pump water tank bit the dust.  But I got some use from the old tank and cut it up - 18 gauge steel.  Why not ? Sabe money when I can.

I had to cut the tank into strips and tack them together. I love those butt clamps.  Then I used old cereal boxes to design a floor for the shell. It got a bit tricky where the floor meets the radiator brace but turned out ok I think. I curled the back where it meets the rad so that all of the radiator face remains open to airflow. I'll finish up the tacks today and mount it in the shell for a test fit.

My goal is to ensure that any air coming through the grill can exit only through the rad. I'm hoping this solves the problem. If not, plan B, C, etc. whatever they are. I really would hate to toss the shell. I put a lot of time into it. But if this fails, your fresh approach sounds hopeful. Thank you again.



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BELLEVILLE, ONT

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Hey Cuddles, why don't you just take the nose cone off and take it for a drive? If it doesn't over heat then you know exactly what the problem was. Restricted airflow.

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PETERBOROUGH, ONT

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Hi Lightspeed Mike. I guess I missed the obvious again. Good idea. But I already built the shell and now the floor for the shell so I am going to slap it together and try it out but if this fails, your idea is next. Thank you. It would be interesting to see the difference in temperature with it open. I could always put the old model A shell back on if this fails. What a shame. All that work.

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FOXBORO, ONT

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Seeker1056 wrote:

any chance you have a reverse rotation water pump on it by accident?


 i thought of that one also when you posted.  when i replaced the alt on the 50 truck with the 5lt a couple of months ago i was scratching my head  figuring out how the sepitine belt went back on and googled it.

they mentioned to check the rotation of the pump but i think the biggest app for the revere pump is in marine use. when i had the bigger boats with twin screw i/o's the one motor ran in reverse rotation to even the balance out.  i think some of older  the drive shaft boats might of ran the same rotation and they reversed the prop rotation through a gear box.  legit point.



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FOXBORO, ONT

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Lightspeed Mike wrote:

Hey Cuddles, why don't you just take the nose cone off and take it for a drive? If it doesn't over heat then you know exactly what the problem was. Restricted airflow.


 i don't know mike there is a lot of space for the air to go out around the sides  with that cone shell off as it pretty much forced all air through the rad with boxed sides on it. it my like a pusher fan on the front.  



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FOXBORO, ONT

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Cuddles wrote:

Thank you Warren. I started making a 'floor' for the nose earlier today. I will get the thermometer (Inkbird) too. I'll have to remove the chainmail grill to make a pattern for the floor to ensure it fits snug to the base of the rad so this works out well.


 i would be interested to see if this is the fix also.  if it wasn't sealed up and all air more or less  forced through to the rad it would be a big difference acting like an forward mount shroud



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FOXBORO, ONT

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if i am seeing it right that is a odd ball looking fan on there now bud.  there are some pretty aggressive blades out there that can move a lot of air. 



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PETERBOROUGH, ONT

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Bill (my friend) mentioned buying a flex fan but to be sure and get a good one. I'll have to research them. Another aspect that is new to me.

The curious thing to me is that my first trip to Millbrook had no heating issues. 180 degrees there and back. A cool morning run about half an hour away - then home at 3 or 4 - no problem. It was very hot for the day to Port Hope but 220 seems a bit high.

I have all the shell removed now. Perhaps a run today to see what happens. Maybe a screen in front to protect the rad from bugs?

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MARKHAM, ONT

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no screen, drive it to check already!

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PUGSY


PETERBOROUGH, ONT

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OK. No screen. Thank you 123pugsy.

Are you driving to any shows this year Jari ?

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WATFORD, ONT

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Cuddles, just read through the whole post on the heating problem. You been given a lot of good "long distance" advise but it's easy to miss that one little clue if your not there standing beside it. You've been basing the problem on the temp readings from a gauge you don't seem to trust. In my eyes, that needs to be confirmed as good or bad. Otherwise, your going to continue to chase your own tail. A simple test (however it can be bit messy) is to remove the electric sender, and plug the hole with an appropriate sized plug. Of course you do this when everything is cold, no need for the engine to be hot or running. Cold is preferred. Set a small metal pot/bucket close by that you can heat up water in to the boiling point. You will have to do this close to the car because your going to have to use a couple of temporary wire jumpers just to reach the pot/bucket. One from the gauge and one as a ground. The dark green goes right back on the sender where it came from on the center stud, the other end temporarily hooks up to the dark green gauge wire that came off the sender.(This is the jumper we're talking about.) The second wire needs to be stripped back far enough to wrap around the brass body of the sender and twisted tight. The other end is securely grounded to the engine.(The other jumper wire.) To check the connections, turn your key switch on to the run position, do not start, that is not required. If the needle jumps up to the cold position great, your good to go to the next step. If not, you likely have a bad connection. (You may need a second set of eyes to watch the gauge if the jumpers are to short to let you see what the gauge is reading at the time of the test.) Ok... heat up the water to a boil, turn on the key switch to the run position, hang onto the wires at a safe distance (12 inches or so) from the sender and dip it into the boiling water. Let it hang in the water, (don't let it rest against the sides or bottom of the container, keep it surrounded by water.) The gauge should respond immediately, it should rise to 212 degrees F. If it is less or more there is a fault in the gauge system. (My guess would be the sender) If it reads 212 F it's fine. Now you can tell if you should believe your gauge or not. If it's reading high (the 220F) your trying to fix problem that likely aren't there, if it 212F you have something else going on causing the overheating. Rule out the gauge first, and proceed from there. Best of luck.

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WHITEFISH, ONT

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I'm with sniper as what I'd do to verify just how accurate your gauge is reading. Just remember water boils at 212 degrees at sea level it will boil at bit lower temperature as your elevation increases. This is why your cooling system is pressurized as it raises the boiling point. Another thing is your sending unit matched to your gauge as the gauges and sending units are calibrated to each other by the manufacturer.

You can also test your thermostat by suspending it in a pot of water and heating the water to check its opening and closing. Suspend a thermometer in the water if you want to know the actual temperature the thermostat opens at. If you go with a used mechanical gauge for testing this is a easy way to verify its working accurately.

You say the rad core was replaced how many rows of cores are in the replacement as that's a small looking rad. Watch your coolant level because with no overflow tank any coolant loss out the overflow line will be replaced with air when the system cools down. Hope you know enough not to open the rad cap when hot and under pressure.

Years ago I had a Plymouth that would run very hot a mechanic at a local garage asked what thermostat was installed. I was running a 160 degree thinking the lower temperature would mean the engine would run cooler. Mechanic said it would work better with a 195 degree thermostat as it wouldn't be open as often as a 160 degree thermostat. His reasoning was that the 195 degree thermostat would be closed more often than a 160 degree thermostat so allowing the coolant to sit in the rad longer and thus be cool more before flowing back into the engine block. It sounded reasonable to me and changing to a higher thermostat did help my heating issue with the Plymouth. Others with more knowledge than me please chime in if what this mechanic told me was a bunch of bull****.

You've been told man times in the posts above to verify your gauge is reading accurate temperatures.....so why haven't you done such a easy check of your gauge?

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NIAGARA FALLS, ONT

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I have been going over some of the posts on this site and came across your "overheating" problem.I noticed nothing further since August. Curious weather you solved the problem and are driving again?


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PETERBOROUGH, ONT

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Thank you everyone. I had trouble with the 42 pickup & the 29 model A. Got discouraged and both just sat for a long time. Started getting the boss on my case to fix the 42 (so I'd use her car less). Made a lot of trips to NAPA to finally get the right parts. First name basis there now. Was told by somebody there is nothing in a set of dual points I could break. I proved him wrong. Went to one show to assist with parking but couldn't take either ride. Finally got them both going just in time for winter storage. Hoping next year will be better. Thanks to all for their kind suggestions. A rough year.

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